Giving your notice Post 2/3 Short Timer Syndrome

This is a follow up in a blog series about leaving your employer.  Series starts here.

I’m sure most have heard of it before.  You’ve given your two weeks’ notice and now you can relax and sit back for 2 weeks and watch all the MCM videos out there.  “What are they going to do fire you?” Not so fast, I typically find my last 2 weeks in some companies to be the busiest times I have been there.  Once the company knows you are leaving they want to do everything they can to get any knowledge you have about the systems you have worked on out of you.  They are worried about someone not being able to do your role when you’re gone or to manage that large batch processing engine you wrote 2 years ago.

Wrap up Projects

The company and role you played will primarily dictate what the priority is for you in your last two weeks.  If you were working on major projects they will probably suggest finishing any major coding work and getting that checked in and handed off to someone else.  This would not be the time to start any new projects but mainly to finish up any that you have been working on.  If you are in the middle of the project and can’t complete it before the bomb explodes then you’ll most likely have a person shadowing you so they can take over when you’re gone.

Brain Dump

The company will want a Knowledge Transfer/Brain Dump/Documentation.  This is the time you go back to all the projects you have done and either refresh the documentation (we all keep good documentation right?) or write the documentation that has been missing from your projects.  This could take a short or long time depending on how much you have worked on and how long you have been there.  If you have a good cross trained team that you work with as well this might be less work since the others already know what they need to know.  Either way this is an important step, as I mentioned in the previous post it’s important to meet the companies’ needs during this process. I’m always happy to teach what I know and document the processes the last thing I want from any company I leave is for them to have a hard time managing something I’ve done.  When I complete my documentation of the items I typically zip the files together into a package and then either Email or place them on a share for my Boss to send out to whoever needs them.

Meet With Departments/Project Managers

Your boss may take care of this for you or it might be on your plate but meet with department heads/managers and find out anything that they might need to have documented that you may not have thought of.  You may not be able to meet the demand of all the groups.  If you make a list of what is needed and check off what you have done this gives you something to show that you made an effort to complete everything they asked for.

Next we’ll wrap up the series with the last day.

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3 responses to “Giving your notice Post 2/3 Short Timer Syndrome

  1. As you wrap up projects, make sure you don’t over work. You need time with your family – especially if a move is involved. Work 8 hours and then go home.
    Also, use your Lunch hour and coffee breaks to meet with your close freinds at work to build bridges.
    Other great tips can be found at http://www.manager-tools.com/2006/07/how-to-resign-part-1-of-3.
    Cheers,
    Bill

  2. Great Suggestions Bill. Thanks!

  3. Pingback: Tweets that mention Giving your notice Post 2/3 Short Timer Syndrome | Sql Server Insane Asylum -- Topsy.com

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